Categories
Uncategorized

Who is the boss of a movie? – Studiobinder Best Movies

It’s the audience. You’re always the audience. You’re never the boss of the movie — you’re the audience.” [p. 28]

If your goal is to write great scripts, then you should strive for a writer’s block. But if your goal is to write great scripts, then you shouldn’t try to figure out exactly why your friends are getting stuck on a specific story line. What you should do instead is identify the reason behind your friends’ problems, and then write a script about it!

In order to do this, you can use a writer’s block model with your own friends. And, as this example demonstrates, you can use the model not just to write a great script, but to also figure out what makes someone’s problems unique, when in fact they’re the same problems people face.

So let’s talk about one example.

For the sake of this example, let’s use Robert Redford.

Robert and I grew up in Los Angeles, and Robert was a talented actor — very funny, very smart.

Robert loved movies with great dialogue, and he loved writing these great dialogue scripts.

So what did Robert do to avoid writing blocks? Because of this, Robert was very good at anticipating the story of a story, and if he was having trouble finding a piece of script that was right for the story he was writing, he didn’t need to go hunting around in search of it, instead he simply identified what was different about the scripts in which he had written.

What Robert found was that not all of his friends had the same problems when it came to having problems in a scene. So he identified two problems that all of his friends had: The first problem was having to write a different version of the story than what he had written when he wrote the story…

The second problem was having to write a different version of the story than he had written when he wrote the story.

Since Robert has written dialogue for films and plays, I can see how he would use a writer’s block model to identify this second problem among his friends.
In Jackson Heights: Frederick Wiseman the Filmmaker: Filmmaking

So the first problem he identified was having to write a different version of the story than he had written when he wrote the story…

But then Robert noticed something.

Since he also liked movies with good dialogue with different dialogue styles, his friends were also having problems writing a different version of the story…

Robert could see they were having problems in different ways

filmmaking basics, studiobinder best movies, directing uncsa, 12 stages of filmmaking, filmmaking history